The Washington Square Hotel

The Washington Square Hotel — http://
www.washingtonsquarehotel.com/ –is pleased to announce that, in an
effort to promote a healthier environment for its guests and
employees, it became 100% smoke-free on January 1, 2008,. “The
majority of our guests prefer non-smoking rooms,” states Judy Paul,
co-owner and CEO. “In fact, we discovered that only 8% request a
smoking room. As we near completion of our guest room re-design, it
made sense to us to institute this new policy.” This policy is in
sync with New York’s commitment to a smoke-free environment in public
indoor spaces.

One of the last remaining family-run hotels in the city, the
Washington Square Hotel radiates warmth combined with modern
amenities. Proprietors Dan and Rita Paul, their daughter Judy, and
her husband Marc Garrett are here to welcome visitors from all over
the world. World-travelers themselves, they made sure the hotel was
outfitted with everything a business or leisure travelers would need
on their visit to New York City.

Continue reading

Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse – Midtown

Eureka . . . A Great New York Steak House

 

Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse – Midtown
44 W 56th St
New York, NY 10019
Phone: (212) 245-1550
Cross Street: Between 5th Avenue and 6th Avenue Hours: Mon-Wed 11:30am-11:00pm , Thu-Sat 11:30am- 12am , Sun 3pm-11pm
uncle-chandelier
The place to meet, eat and enjoy the finer things in life. Specializing in 21-28 day dry aged USDA Prime meats, Kobe beef, Australian lobster tails and offering a wide array of seafood and wines. Old world charm and impeccable service.

uncle-facade

uncle-upstairs

Uncle Jack’s has become a legend, known for unsurpassed consistency and quality. Featuring the finest USDA prime 21-28 day Dry Aged Beef, Kobe Steaks, Fresh Seafood, and a full menu of the highest quality foods and wines available.

Steaks, seafood and real Kobe beef the atmosphere is elegant, including private rooms. The Turn of The Century Hollywood set will blow you away and is the perfect New York Steak House fantasy atmosphere in which to enjoy remarkable beef at prices which to some may seem equally remarkable. But, as the saying goes, if you have to question the price, you can’t afford it. And there is no finer quality in New York.

Tuxedoed captains recite the entrees slowly with love, in this elegant balconied restaurant with heavy drapes, a colossal crystal chandelier, plush velour chairs and fringed lamps. The walls are hung with framed portraits of the likes of the Rockefellers and Carnegies. Service is so seamless and perfect you’ll want to linger for hours. And you know someone cares when the bread assortment arrives. Not standard Steak House schlock, but lovely Irish Soda Bread, Flat bread, a variety of fresh and delicious rolls and creamy, unsalted butted.

Don’t over do it. Portions are huge and you’ll want to sample the wonders of the kitchen. First-rate starters include sparkling lump crabmeat and featherweight crab cakes, lightly breaded in Panko (Japanese Bread crumbs) in a puddle of French inspired Lobster sauce. The tomatoes and fresh mozzarella are exquisite.

Kobe beef and Akaushi are grown in Texas from Japanese stock. They are marvelous steaks: intense, memorable and buttery. But the authentic Japanese version is worth $250 and indecently delicious. But don’t miss the Prime Rib Chop (aka the fred flintstone) – 30 ounce USDA prime rib, prepared and served in its own juices.

All sides are recommended. Especially nutmeg-flecked creamed spinach and the smooth, garlic-mashed-potatoes. On the award-winning wine list, you’ll find the elite “Screaming Eagle” 2003 cabernet sauvignon, at $1,500. It is a glory. And what other wine list in New York offers both “vertical and horizontal” pages of gems to savor.

uncle-dessert

If you have room for dessert, check out the assortment, which includes excellent Tiramisu, Ice Cream, Pecan Pie and Fresh Berries in Cream.
Uncle Jack’s (44 W 56th St) is the best thing to happen to Midtown in many a moon and is already a roaring success. Don’t miss it! That’s A Major on the Walman Report.

Continue reading