STEVE ROSS LAUNCHES THE OAK ROOM’S 29TH SEASON

STEVE ROSS LAUNCHES THE OAK ROOM’S 29TH SEASON JANUARY 6-31
WITH “I REMEMBER HIM WELL: THE SONGS OF ALAN JAY LERNER”

In 1980, Steve Ross opened the legendary Algonquin Hotel’s Oak Room, and today the room itself enjoys legendary status as a world-renowned repository of the Great American Songbook. Steve’s 2007 Oak Room show, a triumph in New York and London, celebrated the sublime words and music of Stephen Sondheim. For the month of January, he will salute another native New Yorker, the great lyricist Alan Jay Lerner. Among the gems Oak Room audiences will hear are “Too Late Now,” “Gigi,” “I’m Glad I’m Not Young Anymore,” “Almost Like Being in Love,” “The Night They Invented Champagne” and “If Ever I would Leave You.” Shows are Tuesday through Thursday at 8:30 and Friday and Saturday at 8:30 and 11:00 pm, with a $60 cover charge plus either a $30 minimum or $70 prix fixe dinner. Reservations: 212 419 9331 or bmcgurn@algonquinhotel.com.

Steve Ross is celebrated as today’s leading interpreter of the words and music of Cole Porter and Noel Coward, and has sung their praises at the Ritz in London, the Crillon and Ritz in Paris, the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, as well as festivals in Hong Kong, Perth and Spoleto. He has hosted radio series for BBC and NPR. He made his off-Broadway debut in 1992 with his own tribute to Fred Astaire, I Won’t Dance and five years later his Broadway debut in the acclaimed revival of Noel Coward’s Present Laughter, at the keyboard and as Fred, the Cockney valet, opposite Frank Langella. He has appeared in concert series at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the 92nd Street Y. A classmate of JFK at Harvard, Alan Jay Lerner followed Cole Porter at Yale and Richard Rodgers at Columbia by contributing songs to their college musicals. While working in New York writing advertising copy and radio scripts, he met composer Frederick Loewe and began a mutually rewarding and successful collaboration that produced Brigadoon, Paint Your Wagon, My Fair Lady and Camelot for the stage and Gigi for the screen. Winner of three Tony Awards and three Oscars, Lerner wrote the screenplay for An American in Paris and also collaborated with composers Kurt Weill (Love Life), Burton Lane (On A Clear Day…, Royal Wedding), among others.

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