Chado

chardo

 

Chado Brings Food to FashionChado is located at 4 East 36 Street and is open for dinner Sunday-Thursday from 5:00 to 11pm, and on Friday and Saturday from 5:00 to 11:30 pm. Chado is also open for lunch from 12pm – 3pm, Monday through Friday. For reservations, please call 212-532-2210.

Adventure into a new realm of fusion-inspired sushi and put Chado restaurant on your list of “things to do.” After making a name for himself at Gari, where he was awarded two stars by The New York Times, chef Mike Lim has teamed up with notable Manhattan restaurateur Omar Balouma (Barbes, Babouche) to reinvigorate Midtown East with their new fusion-inspired sushi concept, Chado. Named for a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, Chado adds Southeast Asian, French, and Latin influences to Japanese food while maintaining the integrity and artistry of traditional Asian cuisine.

The décor is as elegant as the cuisine. Guests are greeted by a massive, stone-carved Buddha at the door, the stage is instantly set for something bold and transporting. Past the long, white bar, semi-circular black leather booths provide intimacy and privacy for each table in the restaurant’s front section, with minimalist panels of Japanese calligraphy denoting the customs of the tea ceremony dotting the wall. An Asian screen separates the back dining room, where a modern sculpted chandelier, sleek red pendant lamps and exposed brick wall play accent to the sushi bar—a true harmony of New York and Japanese aesthetics.

One of the only genuinely epicurian restaurants in the Fashion District, Chado has already become a haven for the industry’s big names, including Marylou Luther, the longtime editor of the International Fashion Sydicate, and the head designers behind large firms like Calvin Klein and Stan Herman. It’s no surprise: between Lim and Balouma’s backgrounds, the dining experience at Chado is pampering but humble, sophisticated but unpretentious. The same applies for the food: it’s intriguing and new, consistent in its delicacy and lightness.

Sushi may be the strong suit, but an array of the chef’s appetizers features gems that shouldn’t be skipped. Among them is the Japanese Style Red Snapper Ceviche, marinated in a combination of yuzu juice and white soy—a playful twist on the expected dash of citrus—all topped with a fresh, crisp blend of radish sprouts, baby endive, and chives. A duck salad with jalapeno plum vinaigrette may sound contrastingly heavy, but it will change anyone’s conception of the oft-weighty protein. Here, it is so gently cooked that the duck melts on the palate, its light gamey flavor left to shine for what it is.

Similarly, lamb tataki is complimented by sun-dried tomato oil and Korean miso—a gentle combination designed so that the quality Australian cut is able to play equal star to its unusual, quirky accompaniments. Even Asian staples get reinterpreted into haute versions, as with the crab- and shrimp-filled Seafood Shrimp Harumaki Rolls with woodear mushrooms, whose spicy kalaminsi (Phillipine lime) nectar dipping sauce holds flavors that are little explored in the city. The fancified eggrolls are but one indication of Lim’s playful, clever tendency to spin the classics with a bit of unexpected edge—adventurous enough for gourmands, but approachable enough for the average diner.

His inclination to push boundaries reappears in his treatment of sushi, wherein he adds sauces to augment the usual soy (which here, comes refined—it’s home-brewed). Each is brushed or dotted onto the fish with a refined aesthetic eye, such as the kalamata paste that’s speckled atop hamachi, adding the saltiness expected from soy, but without the sodium. A smooth guacamole-like puree is infused with wasabi and dolloped daintily over toro—a play on tuna avocado rolls—while salmon might benefit from a Peruvian-inspired spicy salsa or gingery mustard, depending on the chef’s whim. All his toppings, sauces, and recipes, are closely guarded secrets—so much so that Lim prepares them before any other kitchen staff arrives in order to protect their confidentiality. It’s not hard to see why—the approach is entirely unique, adding flavor explosions not generally associated with sushi, but without violating the integrity of an age-old culinary form.

The pairings are best tasted through the omakase menu, a custom-created experience in which diners interact with the chef for a meal tailored to their preferences. In this way, diners take a walk through the various expressions of Chado’s fusion sushi—some more traditional, some more playful—challenging their own expectations of Japanese cookery. Just keep the food coming till you tell them to stop. You are charged by the number of pieces you order.

Those who wish to order by the roll might choose the Chado, a roll filled with spicy shrimp tempura and topped with a kani kama and seaweed salad to balance the crunch and heft of the fried shrimp inside. Also notable: the Spicy Aquatic Roll, with spicy tuna and pickled Japanese cucumber inside and torched salmon and kabayaki sauce above. The special rolls are all created exclusively by the chef, with unique recipes not found anywhere else.

Returning back to the hot dishes from the kitchen, it would be difficult to pass on the chef’s memorable Chilean Sea Bass, which comes dressed in a deeply colored, sake-infused nori sauce and served with baby bok choy. The thick cut of fish is perfectly cooked: tender and buttery on the inside, with a definitive crunch from the gently seared skin. On the side, a dainty pile of fried tofu sticks that look like thick-cut French fries, the accompanying red pepper sauce playing their ketchup. They’re not only more virtuous for the nearby fashionistas—they’re also packed with enough flavor to convert the masses. Prime Rib Eye benefits from a roasted shallot and miso sauce; the hefty portion is counterbalanced by a creamy chickpea puree and exotic mushrooms. Together, it’s an exposition on earthy flavors.

Sweet endings include fixings for American tastes or more adventurous ones alike. The former might enjoy the chef’s favorite: a homemade molten chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream, a classic showstopper in its own right. The latter will go for one of the chef’s more creative twists, such as his signature New York style green tea cheesecake, whose rich, dense texture is balanced by the light flavor of tea leaves. All are made in house by Lim himself.

The cocktails are massive and beautifully constructed and service is a dream. Indeed, every part of the Chado experience is, like a great Japanese painting, an exploration of balance and counterbalance, from the flavors on the plate to the restrained but inviting décor. It may be filling a much neglected niche Fashion District, but it’s safe to say that Chado would shine brightly anywhere in the city.

One of New York’s truly original Japanese restaurants!

 

 Copyright 2010 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

Disclosure

ISubject: Celebrate Father’s Day Japanese Style at Chado

To honor all fathers, Chado will be offering a 15% discount on all sushi rolls and their omakase menu.(Father’s Day Only)

At Chado, dads will be able to experience Southeast Asian, French, and Latin infused Japanese food that gives each dish a unique twist seldom found in Japanese restaurants, and dishes like the Chado roll, filled with spicy shrimp tempura and topped with a kani kama and seaweed salad that will leave the whole family impressed.

Head to Murray Hill to dine at Chado on June 20th for a new twist to the classic father’s day.

Chado

4 East 36th Street

212.532.2210

Just Opened Chado Brings Food to Fashion

After making a name for himself at Gari, where he was awarded two stars by The New York Times, chef Mike Lim has teamed up with notable Manhattan restaurateur Omar Balouma (Barbes, Babouche) to reinvigorate Midtown East with their new fusion-inspired sushi concept, Chado. Named for a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, Chado adds Southeast Asian, French, and Latin influences to Japanese food while maintaining the integrity and artistry of traditional Asian cuisine.

One of the only genuinely epicurian restaurants in the Fashion District, Chado has already become a haven for the industry’s big names, including Marylou Luther, the longtime editor of the International Fashion Sydicate, and the head designers behind large firms like Calvin Klein and Stan Herman. It’s no surprise: between Lim and Balouma’s backgrounds, the dining experience at Chado is pampering but humble, sophisticated but unpretentious. The same applies for the food: it’s intriguing and new, consistent in its delicacy and lightness.

Sushi may be the strong suit, but an array of the chef’s appetizers features gems that shouldn’t be skipped. Among them is the Japanese Style Red Snapped Ceviche, marinated in a combination of yuzu juice and white soy—a playful twist on the expected dash of citrus—all topped with a fresh, crisp blend of radish sprouts, baby endive, and chives. A duck salad with jalapeno plum vinaigrette may sound contrastingly heavy, but it will change anyone’s conception of the oft-weighty protein. Here, it is so gently cooked that the duck melts on the palate, its light gamey flavor left to shine for what it is.

Similarly, lamb tataki is complimented by sun-dried tomato oil and Korean miso—a gentle combination designed so that the quality Australian cut is able to play equal star to its unusual, quirky accompaniments. Even Asian staples get reinterpreted into haute versions, as with the crab- and shrimp-filled Seafood Shrimp Harumaki Rolls with woodear mushrooms, whose spicy kalaminsi (Phillipine lime) nectar dipping sauce holds flavors that are little explored in the city. The fancified eggrolls are but one indication of Lim’s playful, clever tendency to spin the classics with a bit of unexpected edge—adventurous enough for gourmands, but approachable enough for the average diner.

His inclination to push boundaries reappears in his treatment of sushi, wherein he adds sauces to augment the usual soy (which here, comes refined—it’s home-brewed). Each is brushed or dotted onto the fish with a refined aesthetic eye, such as the kalamata paste that’s speckled atop hamachi, adding the saltiness expected from soy, but without the sodium. A smooth guacamole-like puree is infused with wasabi and dolloped daintily over toro—a play on tuna avocado rolls—while salmon might benefit from a Peruvian-inspired spicy salsa or gingery mustard, depending on the chef’s whim. All his toppings, sauces, and recipes, are closely guarded secrets—so much so that Lim prepares them before any other kitchen staff arrives in order to protect their confidentiality. It’s not hard to see why—the approach is entirely unique, adding flavor explosions not generally associated with sushi, but without violating the integrity of an age-old culinary form.

The pairings are best tasted through the omakase menu, a custom-created experience in which diners interact with the chef for a meal tailored to their preferences. In this way, diners take a walk through the various expressions of Chado’s fusion sushi—some more traditional, some more playful—challenging their own expectations of Japanese cookery.

Those who wish to order by the roll might choose the Chado, a roll filled with spicy shrimp tempura and topped with a kani kama and seaweed salad to balance the crunch and heft of the fried shrimp inside. Also notable: the Spicy Aquatic Roll, with spicy tuna and pickled Japanese cucumber inside and torched salmon and kabayaki sauce above. The special rolls are all created exclusively by the chef, with unique recipes not found anywhere else.

Returning back to the hot dishes from the kitchen, it would be difficult to pass on the chef’s memorable Chilean Sea Bass, which comes dressed in a deeply colored, sake-infused nori sauce and served with baby bok choy. The thick cut of fish is perfectly cooked: tender and buttery on the inside, with a definitive crunch from the gently seared skin. On the side, a dainty pile of fried tofu sticks that look like thick-cut French fries, the accompanying red pepper sauce playing their ketchup. They’re not only more virtuous for the nearby fashionistas—they’re also packed with enough flavor to convert the masses. Prime Rib Eye benefits from a roasted shallot and miso sauce; the hefty portion is counterbalanced by a creamy chickpea puree and exotic mushrooms. Together, it’s an exposition on earthy flavors.

Sweet endings include fixings for American tastes or more adventurous ones alike. The former might enjoy the chef’s favorite: a homemade molten chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream, a classic showstopper in its own right. The latter will go for one of the chef’s more creative twists, such as his signature New York style green tea cheesecake, whose rich, dense texture is balanced by the light flavor of tea leaves. All are made in house by Lim himself.

Given how artful Lim is in his cooking and presentation, it’s fitting that Balouma, too, has heavily considered the aesthetic of Chado’s space. With the greeting of a massive, stone-carved Buddha at the door, the stage is instantly set for something bold and transporting. Past the long, white bar, semi-circular black leather booths provide intimacy and privacy for each table in the restaurant’s front section, with minimalist panels of Japanese calligraphy denoting the customs of the tea ceremony dotting the wall. An Asian screen separates the back dining room, where a modern sculpted chandelier, sleek red pendant lamps and exposed brick wall play accent to the sushi bar—a true harmony of New York and Japanese aesthetics.

Indeed, every part of the Chado experience is, like a great Japanese painting, an exploration of balance and counterbalance, from the flavors on the plate to the restrained but inviting décor. It may be filling a much neglected niche Fashion District, but it’s safe to say that Chado would shine brightly anywhere in the city.

Chado is located at 4 East 36 Street and is open for dinner Sunday-Thursday from 5:00 to 11pm, and on Friday and Saturday from 5:00 to 11:30 pm. Chado is also open for lunch from 12pm – 3pm, Monday through Friday. For reservations, please call 212-532-2210.


Sample Dinner Menu

Cold Appetizers

Assorted Fish Ceviche Of The Day yuzu white soy plum sauce
12.00

Spicy Tuna Tar Tar pickled japanese cucumber, toasted pistachio, chives & home brewed sweet aged soy
12.00

Oshinko assorted pickles
6.00

Tako Su thinly sliced boiled japanese octopus with tozasu vinaigrette
12.00

Hot Appetizers

Edamame japanese soy beans with sea salt
6.00

Shrimp & Crab Harumaki (Homemade) spring rolls with baby leeks woodear mushrooms, spicy kalamansi nectar dip
9.00

Beef Short Ribs french fries, garlicky honey tamari sauce
12.00

Lamb Tataki seared australian lamb loin, samjang miso sauce, chop garlic fries
12.00

Kinoko sautéed assorted mushrooms in sake garlic soy
8.00

Shrimp Shumai steamed
7.00

Soups

Carrot Cauliflower Miso Soup
6.00

Traditional Miso Soup
3.50

Salad

Organic Field Greens sesame kafir lime dressing
6.00

Green Seaweed – Chuka Salad marinated with sesame seed & sesame oil
6.00

Duck Salad jalapeno plum vinaigrette
11.00

Hijiki Salad With Mesclun – Watercress cooked japanese seaweed with coriander daikon dressing
6.50

Tempura Appetizer

Shrimp Only
(4 pcs) 15.00

Shrimps & Vegetables
(3&5 pcs) 12.00

Sushi Bar

Sushi Deluxe 9 pcs of sushi and 1 tuna roll
29.00

Chirashi assorted sashimi on a bed of seasoned sushi rice
32.00

Sashimi assorted slices of fresh raw fish
28.00

Popular Mix And Match Sushi 3 pcs tuna, 3 pcs yellow tail, 3 pcs salmon and 1 eel cucumber roll
32.00

Special Sushi Rolls

Sea Rock Roll king salmon, persian cucumber, shiso, scallions & avocado with mirio infused bean sauce
12.00

Spicy Aquatic Roll spicy tuna with crunchy flakes, ao kappa top with torched salmon and kabayaki sauce
16.00

Chado Roll shrimp tempura, kani kama top with seaweed salad
16.00

Madison Roll eel tempura with cucumber inside top with avocado and chef’s special sauce
15.00

Chado’s Style Omakase chef’s choice of sushi or sashimi from our selections of the freshest seasonal seafood with our own unique signature sauces and toppings

Entrees From The Kitchen

All Entrees Are Served With A Side Of Steamed Premium White Rice.

Alaskan Wild King Salmon spicy ginger red miso sauce, sauteed haricots verts, chives chutney, sauteed mix mushrooms
23.00

Pistachio Caribbean Shrimps top with crab roe puree & chopped pistachio, micro salads
22.00

Organic Chicken Breasts baby bok choy, teriyaki sauce
17.00

Chilean Sea Bass delectable sake infused roasted seaweed sauce, asian vegetables
24.00

Breast Of Duckling soy balsamic reduction, red wine poach posch pear roasted kabocha mash
23.00

Prime Rib Eye Beef roasted shallots aka miso sauce, chick pea puree, exotic mushrooms
27.00

Mixed Tempura shrimps and vegetables
20.00

Vegetables Tempura
17.00

Side Orders

Spicy Sauce

Eel Sauce

Ginger

White Rice

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